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How to raise great queens

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  • How to raise great queens

    The most important thing for getting great queens is that they are fed well. Raising queens when there is abundant food and in a hive with a high density of bees is the best way to insure this.

    The second is that they are mated well. Again raising bees when there is abundant food usually insures there are abundant drones.

    Next is letting them lay for three weeks before you cage or bank them. Preferable DON'T cage or bank them, introduce them as cells to the hive they will live in or combine your mating nuc with the hive they will live in.

    Last is genetics. Breed from your best stock. Don't over complicate it. You know the bees you like. The ones that are thriving and making honey. Breed from those.
    Nehawka, Nebraska. My website: bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm em portugues: bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm My book: ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
    -----"Everything works if you let it."--James "Big Boy" Medlin-----

  • #2
    A study on emergency queens:
    David C. Gilley · David R. Tarpy · Benjamin B. Land
    Effect of queen quality on interactions between workers and dueling queens in honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies
    http://www.culturaapicola.com.ar/apu...cto_obrras.pdf
    Selection of high-quality queens by the workers during queen development has been demonstrated by Hatch et al. (1999), who found that during emergency queen rearing (the process by which workers rear queens from worker larvae to replace a queen that has died unexpectedly) workers preferentially destroyed queen cells built from older worker larvae. Despite selective behavior by the workers during queen rearing, considerable variation in quality exists among newly emerged adult queens (Eckert 1934; Clarke 1989; Fischer and Maul 1991). This variation in quality among queens gives workers the opportunity to benefit by selecting high quality queens that are fully developed, when the decision will be most accurate.
    Nehawka, Nebraska. My website: bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm em portugues: bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm My book: ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
    -----"Everything works if you let it."--James "Big Boy" Medlin-----

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    • #3
      Thank you Michael. I tried my hand at grafting this spring using the same criteria. I got 30 percent take. Let's just say there is a learning curve. My sprung was super busy and was not able to do it a second round. Excited to try again next spring.

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      • #4
        Michael, Have you had any success with introducing virgin queens under 24 hours old to queenless hives? If so what coniditions?
        Angela
        Kalispell, Montana Zone 4a
        Second Year Beekeeper

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        • #5
          I have not had good luck introducing virgin queens. Heavy smoke followed by direct release has worked best but still not that well.
          Nehawka, Nebraska. My website: bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm em portugues: bushfarms.com/pt_bees.htm My book: ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
          -----"Everything works if you let it."--James "Big Boy" Medlin-----

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